Newsletter

THE GREAT BRITISH MONEY LAUNDERETTE

Front companies in the UK are at the heart of an investigation into one of Europe’s biggest money-laundering operations, allegedly forming part of a conspiracy to make $20bn (£12.5bn) of dirty money look legitimate. The funds are believed to have come from major criminals and corrupt officials around the world wanting to make their ill-gotten cash appear “clean”, so they can spend it without suspicion.

GLASGOW

Standing Group on Organised Crime Section at the 8th ECPR General Conference in Glasgow

3 – 6 September 2014

Main Campus, University of Glasgow, Adam Smith Building, G12 8QQ, Scotland

Following the success of the Standing Group on Organised Crime (SGOC)’s Section “Transnational Organised Crime in a Globalised World” at the 7th ECPR General Conference in Bordeaux in 2013, SGOC members have reaffirmed their commitment to creating an intellectual platform for the study of terrorism, organised crime, and corruption by putting together a section “Understanding and Tackling the Roots of Insecurity: Terrorism, Transnational Organised Crime and Corruption” at the ECPR General Conference taking place at the University of Glasgow from the 3rd to the 6th of September 2014. The section will be chaired by Dr. Yuliya Zabyelina (University of Edinburgh) and co- chaired by Dr. Helena Carrapico (University of Dundee).

The Section offers to review traditional understandings of security and insecurity, and suggests raising questions about the impact of globalization on these concepts. It also proposes to examine a series of phenomena that are currently understood as transnational security threats, including, but not limited to, terrorism and terrorism financing, transnational organised crime in its various manifestations, environmental crime, illegal migration, cyber-crime, and illicit economics of failed states and (post)-conflict areas. The Section also calls for assessments on the relevance of these problems for the security of the international and European communities, both states and individuals.

http://www.ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=14

GLASGOW

Standing Group on Organised Crime Section at the 8th ECPR General Conference in Glasgow

3 – 6 September 2014

Main Campus, University of Glasgow, Adam Smith Building, G12 8QQ, Scotland

Following the success of the Standing Group on Organised Crime (SGOC)’s Section “Transnational Organised Crime in a Globalised World” at the 7th ECPR General Conference in Bordeaux in 2013, SGOC members have reaffirmed their commitment to creating an intellectual platform for the study of terrorism, organised crime, and corruption by putting together a section “Understanding and Tackling the Roots of Insecurity: Terrorism, Transnational Organised Crime and Corruption” at the ECPR General Conference taking place at the University of Glasgow from the 3rd to the 6th of September 2014. The section will be chaired by Dr. Yuliya Zabyelina (University of Edinburgh) and co- chaired by Dr. Helena Carrapico (University of Dundee).

The Section offers to review traditional understandings of security and insecurity, and suggests raising questions about the impact of globalization on these concepts. It also proposes to examine a series of phenomena that are currently understood as transnational security threats, including, but not limited to, terrorism and terrorism financing, transnational organised crime in its various manifestations, environmental crime, illegal migration, cyber-crime, and illicit economics of failed states and (post)-conflict areas. The Section also calls for assessments on the relevance of these problems for the security of the international and European communities, both states and individuals.

http://www.ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=14

“UNDERSTANDING AND TACKLING THE ROOTS OF INSECURITY” AT THE ECPR GENERAL CONFERENCE

The ECPR Standing Group on Organised Crime had the pleasure of participating, once more, in the ECPR’s annual conference. This year’s event, at the University of Glasgow, was particularly marked by a high turn-out of participants,  excellent organization, and topical subjects, such as the on-going debate on Scottish secession from the United Kingdom. The Section proposed by the Standing Group on “Understanding and Tackling the Roots of Insecurity: terrorism, transnational organized crime and corruption” was among the best attended and was characterized by a very high standard of presentations and discussion. The Section, which was our largest so far with 65 participants, was composed of 9 panels, covering a large range of security topics interconnected with organized crime.

CALL FOR PAPERS: SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE EUROPEAN REVIEW OF ORGANISED CRIME (EROC) – “SPACE ODDITY? EXPLORING ORGANISED CRIME VENTURES IN CYBER SPACE”

Special Issue editors: Dr. Helena Carrapico (Aston University, UK) and Dr. Anita Lavorgna (University of Wolverhampton, UK)

Over the past two decades, the development of modern societies has become intimately interconnected with information technologies. Such trend is particularly visible among the increasing number of personal objects, household appliances and professional structures connected to information networks. Although such evolution is usually applauded from an economic and societal perspective, it is also understood as constituting a risk in security terms. As the degree of connectivity dependence of individuals, companies and critical infrastructures grows, so does the likelihood of technology being abused, in particular for criminal purposes. As a result, cyber crime has become, over the past few years, the object of increased concern in Europe. Not only does it represent a considerable cost to societies, but it also continues to constitute an important challenge for law enforcement and judicial systems, due to its technical complexity and rapid innovative character.

Although organised crime is generally presented by policy makers and international organizations as a major actor in cyber crimes, the academic literature has, so far, paid limited attention to this element. More specifically, limited research has been conducted on how different types of organised crime groups use cyber space to conduct their traditional activities, and on how new illicit online activities have emerged as a result of organised crime’s digital shift.

In view of countering this gap in the literature, this special issue welcomes theoretical and empirical articles on the connections between traditional and new forms of organised crime and cyber space. Topics in this special issue include (but are not limited to) definitional debates, national and international political responses, online investigations (including prevention and detection, investigation techniques, search, seizure, forensics, prosecution and trial), law enforcement cooperation, and critical perspectives.

The Special Issue will be published in EROC in September 2015. Articles should be submitted by the 5th of January 2015. However, authors are strongly encouraged to express interest and send abstracts of potential contributions to the editors by the 3rd of November 2014.

For expressions of interest, please contact the editors of the special issue at h.farrand-carrapico@aston.ac.uk and Anita.Lavorgna@wlv.ac.uk. For more information about EROC, please visit our website at http://sgocnet.org/site/the-review-eroc/.

 

JMLC SPECIAL ISSUE – ORGANISED CRIME: ORIGINS AND PROJECTIONS

The special issue came out of a joint one day programme on “Organised crime yesterday, today, and tomorrow”, involving speakers from the SGOC and the Symposium on Economic Crime held annually at Jesus College, Cambridge.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/jmlc/18/2

ECPR STANDING GROUP ON ORGANISED CRIME FIRST GENERAL CONFERENCE – OLD AND NEW FORMS OF ORGANISED AND SERIOUS CRIME BETWEEN THE LOCAL AND THE GLOBAL

11-12 December 2015

Department of Political Sciences Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II Naples, Italy

Globalization and growing economic interdependence, that have for so long been regarded as pacifying and stabilizing factors of financial transactions and international relations, have strongly encouraged, the transformation of organised and serious crime, over the last 30 years, beyond borders, places and people and, in some cases, even, identifiable victims. Improved communication networks and information technologies, have increasingly blurred national borders, improved the mobility of people, goods and services across countries, and have consolidated the globalized economy. These have all acted as facilitators, enabling the more traditional forms of organized and serious crime to go beyond their supposed local dimension and conventional explanations. Thus, the dialectics between local and global has emerged as a distinctive aspect of contemporary forms of crime.

The ECPR standing group on organised crime’s first general conference aims to explore the characteristics, resources, strategies and modus operandi adopted by traditional and new emerging criminal organizations operating both at local and global level, with a view to presenting both theoretical and empirical studies as well as making contributions to policy developments. Scholars and researchers, civil servants as well as practitioners are all encouraged to submit relevant papers in order to forge a three-way discussion that moves beyond traditional academic debates.

Panels and papers addressing a wide array of topics are most welcome, they could include:

  1. The grey area: the relationships existing between criminal networks and ‘legal’ actors especially as far as the infiltration in the political and economic contexts is concerned;
  2. The symbolic dimension of organised crime groups and their communication strategies;
  3. Illicit trafficking across the Mediterranean;
  4. Social economy as an antidote to criminal power. The national and international experience in freezing, forfeiture and the social reuse of assets confiscated from organised crime;
  5. Women in organised crime and terrorist networks;
  6. Analysing criminal mobility;
  7. Methods for studying organised crime;
  8. Perceptions, reality and fact of organised crime;
  9. International and European cooperation in the fight against organised crime;
  10. The crime-terror nexus and its relevance for security.

Notes for Panel organisers and paper givers

Authors are invited to submit their abstracts either for panels or for a single paper. All contributions will be in English.

Panel proposals should include: title, rational, from 3 to 4 papers, a chair and a discussant. Paper givers are invited to submit an abstract that should not exceed 300 words. Each panel will last 1.30 hours. Normally sessions will include from 3 to 4 papers, a chair and a discussant. Each presentation will last 15 minutes.

Abstracts must be submitted to ecprsgoc.conference2015@gmail.com before 19 June 2015. The letter of notification will be sent by 17 July 2015 and registration for the conference will close on 13 of November 2015.

For further information please contact the Organising Committee at
ecprsgoc.conference2015@gmail.com

Event fees

Conference fees include participation and lunches/coffee breaks. ECPR Members £60
ECPR Student Members £50*
Non-ECPR Members £80
Non-ECPR Student £70*

Please note that all participants wishing to attend must pay a conference fee.

*Students must send a copy of their student card or a letter from the Head of Department where they are enrolled to the Conference team by 10 October 2015 in order to pay a reduced conference fee.

Cancellation policy

In line with the Office of Fair Trading and EU Distance Selling regulations, there is a 7 day cooling off period following registration during which time you have the right to cancel and receive a full refund of the Conference fee. Cancellation/withdrawal from the event after the 7 day cooling off period and before midnight Brussel time 18 November 2015 will receive a refund of 50%.Cancellation/withdrawals received after the 7 day cooling off period and after 18 November will not be eligible for a refund.

Organising Committee

Felia Allum (University of Bath, UK), Francesca Longo (University of Catania, Italy) Daniela Irrera (University of Catania, Italy), Monica Massari (University of Naples, Federico II, Italy), Michele Mosca ((University of Naples, Federico II, Italy), Luciano Brancaccio (University of Naples, Federico II, Italy), Anna Sergi (University of West London, UK).

INTENSIVE SUMMER SCHOOL ON ORGANISED CRIME 2014, CATANIA UNIVERSITY AND ECPR SGOC

Organised crime is complex. Thus, it is crucial to examine this phenomenon from different perspectives with the help of distinguished experts from a number of different fields. It is even better when interested, motivated and friendly students from across the world come together to research, discuss, question and sometimes even provide answers to issues relating to organised crime. In addition, if this is all well organised, funded by the European Commission and takes place in a fascinating and stimulating environment, the whole event promises to be a huge success.

And this is exactly what happened during the Intensive Summer School on Organised Crimeorganised by the ECPR Standing Group on Organised crime in Catania, Sicily from the 22nd June to 5th July 2014. I was lucky enough to be one of the participants chosen from the University of Bath to attend. In my opinion, all crucial fields relating to OC were covered. Distinguished academics and practitioners provided insights on security-related issues, EU policy, law, police cooperation and many others. We tackled pressing issues such as how to actually conduct research on OC and gained an understanding into the fight against organised crime undertaken by civil society in Sicily. However, the Summer School was everything but one-way communication. Frequently, we discussed issues in groups (that often continued into our leisure time), prepared and held presentations. We even simulated a European Council meeting – in which a lot of realpolitik was involved. All in all, I learnt a lot.

But it was not only the formal programme that made the Summer School a fascinating experience. I met many very smart, motivated, and friendly people during the two weeks in Catania, from whom I also learnt many things during our discussions but with whom I also had much fun after the official programme had ended in the evenings. Here, I should mention that the entire event was very well organised and that we were also offered some exciting and fun leisure time activities during the weekend.

All of this wouldn’t have been possible without the generous funding of the European Commission, the University of Catania’s facilities nor the ECPR SGOC’s initiatives and vision. This shows me that the European idea is about bringing people from different backgrounds together to learn from, teach each other and thus to contribute to solving complex problems. It also showed me that organised crime is regarded as a phenomenon that needs to be tackled by motivated people from various backgrounds and disciplines. This year’s Intensive Summer School on Organised Crime was a step in that direction. I hope that many more steps will follow.

Stephan Bernhard Pruss, July 2014

Student “Master in International Security”

University of Bath, UK

EROC CALL FOR PAPERS

The European Review of Organised Crime is accepting submissions for the next issues!

We welcome theoretical and empirical contributions presenting the latest research on organised crime broadly conceived from a variety of disciplines, such as criminology, criminal justice, political science, law, security studies, sociology, gender studies, economics, media studies, anthropology, and history. We also seek contributions from practitioners who can share knowledge about organised crime by drawing upon their on-the-ground experience.

We are now collecting papers for Issues 2 and 3. The deadline for the submission of manuscripts is October, 12. However, authors are strongly encouraged to express interest and send abstracts of potential contributions to the editors by August, 31 at the latest.

For full guidelines and submission details visit our website (http://sgocnet.org/site/the-review-eroc/) or contact us at european.review.oc(at)gmail.com.

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